Tech developed to for non-invasive microscopic brainwave measurements

The principle of forming a conductive nanomesh and the material structure.
The principle of forming a conductive nanomesh and the material structure.

Korean research team has successfully developed a technique to make a new material that can measure brainwaves without making an incision into a patient’s scalp. A research team headed by Dr. Lee Hyung-jung from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced on Feb. 11 that they have succeeded in developing a new material with a mesh structure capable of detecting even weak biosignals when attached to a human skull. It was done by combining a single-layer carbon nanotube and a substance that the team calls P8GB#1.

Biosignals from a brain, a heart, and muscles are usually delivered in the form of ions. It is possible to get various kinds of information by changing ion signals into electronic signals and analyzing the result using electronic devices. The research team discovered P8GB#1, a substance with a tendency to stick to single-layer carbon nanotubes, producing a highly-conductive nanomesh. The material with a minute mesh structure can detect electronic signals owing to the large contact surface.

For full article, see Business Korea.

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Cancer can be checked with a drop of blood: ETRI

2012_12_etri_bloodThe state-run Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) announced Wednesday that it has developed a whole blood processing chip and bio-sensor array chip, which enable anyone check diseases or food toxins at an earlier stage.

The whole blood processing chip enables anyone to easily screen cancers within 30 seconds, as it separates even one drop of blood into blood cells and plasma.

Currently, blood cells are separated from blood plasma by using a centrifugal separator, but it requires complicate procedure over a long time with the participation of medical doctors.

For full article, see Korea Times.