SKKU developed tech to make graphene batteries 10x smaller, same strength

2015_02_aerogel batteryA Korean research team has successfully developed a technology to make a sponge-like electrode material using graphene and a polymer, leading to a graphene battery. The newly-developed battery is ten times as small as existing ones, but can show the same product performance.

A research team headed by Park Ho-seok, professor of the School of Chemical Engineering at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), announced on Feb. 1 that it has succeeded in developing a very porous graphene aerogel electrode material by combining polyvinyl alcohol and graphene. Studies on developing high-capacity and rapidly-chargeable batteries are underway worldwide. It is necessary to compress devices in order to supply energy in extreme conditions. However, when existing graphene-based batteries are compressed by 30 percent, product performance suffers owing to the destruction of the inside structure.

For full article, see Business Korea.

Advertisements

Korean scientists develop flexible memory device

A group of South Korean scientists has developed a new transparent and highly flexible memory device using graphene electrodes that may help develop a new, more flexible semiconductor or display panel, the science ministry said Wednesday.

Currently, graphene is used only for the top electrode of monolayers in various products, giving them some flexibility, according to the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning. The team from Seoul’s Sungkyunkwan University, however, was able to use graphene for both the top and bottom electrodes of a monolayer for the first time in the world. The use of graphene for the bottom electrode was made possible through a chemical union of the bottom electrode with the molecular film of organic molecules placed between the two electrodes, the team said.

For full article, see Yonhap News.